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Fibromyalgia Fatigue: How to Get a Restful Sleep and Beat Fatigue

December 21, 2017 in Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia Fatigue

The physical symptoms of fibromyalgia are often accompanied by mental symptoms such as "fibro fog" and a combination of physical and mental symptoms such as chronic fatigue. Chronic fatigue manifests physically as grogginess, exhaustion, and debilitating tiredness. Along with these symptoms comes an inability to concentrate, a lack of interest in participating in activities, and even depression. Fibromyalgia sufferers can monitor several key lifestyle choices in order to manage chronic fatigue.

The Best Sleep Is Accomplished Throughout the Day

If you want a restful, long, and refreshing sleep, you need to remain mindful of this throughout the day. There are a variety of steps you can take and things you should avoid to ensure you wake up rejuvenated the following day.

1. Stimulants

Cut out stimulants six hours before bedtime. This primarily refers to caffeine which can be found in coffee, soda, iced tea, chocolate, and some over-the-counter medications. Caffeine can stay in the system for up to 12 hours and result in an over active nervous system that leaves you tossing and turning in the sheets.

2. Alcohol

Alcohol makes falling asleep easier, and then haunts you later, quite literally. If you have several servings of alcohol close to bedtime your body begins to enter withdrawal causing awakenings and nightmares. Alcohol is also high in sugar which can interfere with that coveted shut-eye.

3. Alarm Clocks

With an impeccable sleep schedule, your body doesn’t need an alarm clock. The natural circadian rhythm in your body will awaken you when you routinely would like to. However, some things we don’t leave up to chance. You can download a free app Sleep Cycle which analyzes your sleep and wakes you up in the lightest sleep phase, as not to interrupt the natural rhythm of your body.

4. External Lights

As humans, we weren’t always accustomed to electricity and the expression “your city never sleeps” just wasn’t a thing. Our body recognizes that when the sun goes down, it’s time to rest. This means that bright lights send conflicting signals to our brain. Dim the lights or begin to turn off most of the lights around your house at least an hour before bed. Make sure your sleeping environment is dark. Cover any bright lights or LED phone screens.

5. Electronic Devices

Unplug hours before bed. You may have been staring at a screen all day and continuing to ogle over your news feed or email. Continuing this tech fixation before bed triggers distracting thoughts, stress responses, irritation to your eyes, and faster brainwaves. Slow down and switch over to a book at least an hour before bed.

6. Meditation

A simple meditation that focuses on the breath can transform your brain frequency. Slower wavelengths mean more time between thoughts. Meditation can take us from a Gamma State (10-- 100 Hz) which is a state of hyperactivity and active learning, all the way to a Theta State (4-8 Hz) which is a deep state of awareness, visual mindfulness, and intuition. You can learn more about meditation in the Mental Health section of the Fibromyalgia pain management program.

For more information on how to live a better life with fibromyalgia, download DR-HO'S FREE Fibromyalgia Management Plan.


More Fibromyalgia Content and Information

Fibromyalgia: This is Everything You Need to Know

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Fibromyalgia Causes: Evidence That It’s Not Just In Your Head

Fibromyalgia Symptoms: How Do I Know If I Have Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia Diet: What to Eat & What to Avoid as a Fibromyalgia Sufferer

Fibromyalgia Exercises: Work Out Chronic Pain

The Fibromyalgia Exercise Plan

Fibromyalgia Tender Points: Where Does It Hurt?

Why is Fibromyalgia More Common In Women?

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